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Twin Transfusion Syndrome 3

  • Lee Rogers '15
  • Twin Transfusion Syndrome 3
  • 2015
  • Digital photograph
  • 23 x 23 inches
  • Courtesy of the artist

Lee Rogers first heard about Hendrix in the book College’s That Change Lives. She fell in love with the campus during her first visit and knew it was where she would spend her undergraduate years. Rogers quickly became involved with the college’s Art Department, participating in an informal art club and working as a Studio Assistant. Her favorite classes were Photography courses with Professor Maxine Payne and Art History courses with Dr. Rod Miller.

Rogers studied photography abroad at Hellenic International Studies in the Arts, a small arts school in Greece. Between her junior and senior year, she received Odyssey funding to work in the Little Museum of Dublin in Ireland. That same summer, she also travelled to Turkey with Dr. Miller and other Art History students, exploring the country’s art and architecture.

Rogers created Twin Transfusion Syndrome 3 during her senior year at Hendrix. This work of photographic self-portraiture was part of her senior portfolio, which explored Rogers’s experience as an identical twin. When she chose to attend a different college than her sister, it was the first time that the pair had been separated for extended periods of time. She wanted to capture the idea that, even though her twin was hundreds of miles away, Rogers could not fully define herself without thinking of her sister. Their identities were inextricably intwined.

Rogers graduated in 2015 with a Studio Art major and an Art History minor. After leaving Hendrix, she volunteered for World Services for the Blind in Little Rock, Arkansas and soon accepted a full-time position with the non-profit. She now lives in Atlanta, Georgia and works remotely as the vocational school’s Development and Communications manager. This job allows her to practice photography and graphic design, while giving back to her community and those within it.

© Windgate Museum of Art at Hendrix College